Vaccine certificates to be compulsory in nightclubs from September 4 months ago

Vaccine certificates to be compulsory in nightclubs from September

Vaccine certificates to be mandatory

"Freedom Day" has ushered in a new sense of hope for the British public. With clubs finally starting to reopen, it should come as no surprise that new rules would come into effect to keep partiers and staff safe from the virus.

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During Prime Minister Boris Johnson's 5 pm briefing, he has announced a number of things. One such thing is covid passports, which will be mandatory from September. Come September, when all over 18-s will have had the chance to be vaccinated; covid passports will be mandatory upon entering clubs.

Despite weeks ago saying that a negative test could be sufficient to enter a club, the Government have now decided quite the opposite. "By September, most [people] going to nightclubs will have been infected...what's the point of him?" asks a disgruntled Twitter user.

This news comes after the long-awaited 'freedom day' came into effect at midnight. Thousands flocked to clubs across the country, which has been met with great criticism on social media.

The response online is a mix of confusion, anger, and fear:

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"Vallance confirms nightclubs etc are #superspreader venues. 35% of 18-30 year olds have not had a first vaccine. Again, what on Earth is Johnson doing? #DowningStreetBriefing"

"Such a cheerful, picture…nightclubs are potential super-spreaders but we’ll open them anyway. I mean, what the hell are they playing at? I don’t get it."

"They should be doing this now! Not just nightclubs it should be football matches, concerts, festivals etc! #COVID19 #FreeDumbDay #FreedomDay"

Though no one can agree on whether or not vaccine passports are a good thing or not, can we all just agree that 'Freedom Day' is a pile of sh*t. The vast majority of us have always been free, and having to wear a mask, keep socially distanced, or not go to Steves for a sesh is not infringing on our freedom.