Halo device 'unequivocally saves life' of Formula 2 driver in Silverstone horror crash 1 month ago

Halo device 'unequivocally saves life' of Formula 2 driver in Silverstone horror crash

'That is a life saved unequivocally'

The Halo device has been credited with saving the life of a racing driver after two cars were involved in a shocking accident at Silverstone on Sunday.

Advertisement

In the Formula 2 race taking place at the track on Sunday morning, drivers Roy Nissany and Dennis Hauger collided on the opening lap.

Hauger lost control of his car, going off the track, before he went over a "sausage kerb" which launched his vehicle into the air.

It then landed on top of Hauger's car, with both then going off track and coming to a halt.

Advertisement

Thankfully, both drivers escaped without any serious injuries, but television replays showed just how horrific the outcome could have been had it not been the Halo around Hauger's cockpit.

One of the commentators said that because of the Halo "that is a life saved unequivocally." he went on to describe the incident as one of the "most frightening accidents I have seen in a long, long time," adding "that is why the Halo's there."

Advertisement

Following the incident, many from across the world of motorsport took voiced their praise and gratitude for the Halo.

F1 journalist Chris Medland tweeted: "The Halo absolutely saved Nissany’s life. 100%"

Advertisement

British racing driver Abbie Eaton said the halo was "one of the best safety systems to be introduced" but was highly critical of the "sausage kerb" that had caused the accident.

Broadcaster Will Buxton agreed, labelling the kerbs "stupid" and blaming them for the "sickening accident."

Advertisement

 

 

The Halo is a protective barrier that goes around the cockpit of the the car, helping to prevent objects and debris from making contact with the head of the driver.

The device was introduced by the FIA in 2018, but drew criticism from many within the sport who claimed it spoiled the cars.

F1 legend Niki Lauda claimed it distorted the "essence of racing cars," whilst reigning world champion Max Verstappen said it "abused the DNA" of F1.

But as time has gone on many have change their mind on the innovation. Last season, Lewis Hamilton said the device had saved him after he was involved in a crash with Verstappen at the Italian Grand Prix.

In a similar incident to the one at Silverstone on Sunday, the Dutchman's car ended up on top of Hamilton's, with the Red Bull's right wheel crushing the top of Hamilton's Mercedes.

Related links: