83 per cent of voters think 'the entire political establishment has failed the country' on Brexit 2 years ago

83 per cent of voters think 'the entire political establishment has failed the country' on Brexit

Only 9 per cent of voters in a recent survey reckon Brexit has been handled well

British politicians on all sides have been accused of failing the country in a damning new poll.

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Belief in our leaders to guide the country through the turbulent Brexit process has significantly decreased since it began, with both Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May castigated for putting party politics ahead of the national interest.

A focus group study of over 2,000 voters by Britain Thinks revealed that 83 per cent agreed with the statement "the entire political establishment has failed the country on Brexit," compared to 9 per cent who disagreed.

The root of the issue seems to be that both Corbyn and May are believed to be 'more concerned about party politics than the national interest', a statement that 69 per cent applied to the Labour leader, and 45 per cent to the prime minister.

Furthermore, May's ability to carry out the rest of her duties during the Brexit process has also been slammed with 73 per cent agreeing with the claim that Brexit 'has significantly hampered our ability to deal with other major issues facing the country."

The findings have led Britain Thinks to determine that there is currently a sense of "absolute despair" with the country's politicians.

And it isn't getting any better, as the numbers show that voters' confidence in Corbyn and May is falling.

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A whopping 49 per cent rated their impression of the prime minister to have gone down since 2016, compared to 17 per cent whose opinion of her has improved.

That is compared to the 61 per cent who now rate Corbyn worse than they did three years ago, in contrast to the mere 10 per cent who now rate the Labour leader higher.

Overall, 68 per cent have lowered their opinion of parliament as a whole while they prove incapable of solving the Brexit logjam, whereas only 38 per cent reckoned they had 'a good understanding' of the withdrawal agreement that MPs voted down by a historic margin earlier in the month.