Line of Duty villain Patricia Carmichael tapped 'H' in morse code during interview scene 1 month ago

Line of Duty villain Patricia Carmichael tapped 'H' in morse code during interview scene

Too obvious, surely?

The penultimate episode of Line of Duty's sixth series has some viewers convinced that Patricia Carmichael is 'H'. Well, various events throughout the episode have many different viewers convinced of several things that can't all be true, which is the beauty of the show - they leave hints and suggestions everywhere only to surprise you with a complete bombshell a week later.

Advertisement

But for now let's focus on this theory, that Carmichael is H.

Carmichael has come in to lead AC-12, as ordered by the chief constable, disrupting much of the good work Steve, Kate and Ted have done in uncovering corruption within the force.

As a result, she lead the 30-minute long interview scene with Jo Davidson, who managed to steal the show with her acting performance despite basically just saying "no comment" for half an hour.

Carmichael's smug, passive aggression heightened the tensions during this scene, which included one potentially huge giveaway regarding the identity of 'H'.

Many viewers were keen to point out that during one of Davidson's 'no comment' answers, Carmichael taps on her notepad four times with her pen, which of course spells out 'H' in morse code.

Advertisement

Does this mean Carmichael is 'H'? Not necessarily, but there is a strong argument that it could be her.

For one thing, she kept on trying to move the interview along every time Hastings got anywhere close to cracking Davidson with regard to the OCG. There is also the fact that every time Ted speaks to his team about 'the fourth man', he adds '... or woman'. Is he just covering his arse from accusations of making assumptions based on gender, or are the writers trying to tell us something?

Advertisement

My instinct is that this is too obvious, and while Carmichael is clearly not an honest copper, someone else higher up is actually 'H'.