YouTuber's real life Squid Game gets more views than actual show did in first week 5 months ago

YouTuber's real life Squid Game gets more views than actual show did in first week

The video has since recieved 10 million likes

Squid Game may have been popular but a Youtuber's carbon copy has surpassed Netflix's staggering viewership in its first week of streaming.

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YouTuber Mr Beast launched his Squid Game depiction on November 24 and yet it has already battered Hwang Dong-hyuk's Netflix masterpiece.

Beast announced the news via Twitter, writing: "42,000,000 views in a day.

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"I remember when I'd be excited if a video broke 10 views lmao.

"I'm literally living the life 13-year-old me would dream of every night and I'm super grateful."

Beast recreated the most iconic scenes from the show with a monetary prize of $465,000 (£343,000) up for grabs.

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The video has received almost 10 million likes on YouTube and reports suggest that Mr Beast has actually made back well over the initial prize money.

"I'm speechless over how well executed this was. They were spot on with EVERYTHING!" reads one comment beneath the video.

Another wrote: "The designs are stunning, the players played the game well. Honestly congratulations for your work!"

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Though Mr Beast has undeniably capitalised on the buzz surrounding Squid Game, the actual show is still continuing to hit the headlines despite premiering back in September.

Most recently, a North Korean man was sentenced to death for smuggling copies of the hit show across the border. A North Korean student who watched the show was also sentenced to life in prison, while others were given five years of hard labour.

Teachers involved in the student's Squid Game scandal were reportedly fired and some could be exiled to work in remote and dangerous mines.

"This all started last week when a high school student secretly bought a USB flash drive containing the South Korean drama Squid Game and watched it with one of his best friends in class," a source in law enforcement in North Hamgyong province is quoted as telling RFA's Korean Service.

"The friend told several other students, who became interested, and they shared the flash drive with them."

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