Ikea 'cuts sick pay' for unjabbed staff in isolation 5 months ago

Ikea 'cuts sick pay' for unjabbed staff in isolation

'All circumstances will be considered on a case-by-case basis'

Ikea has cut sick pay for unvaccinated UK staff members who are forced to isolate despite testing negative.

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Unvaccinated works are only eligible for statutory sick pay of £96.35 a week compared to more than £400 a week the average worker receives.

The move falls in line with current restrictions that see vaccinated people skip isolation if they have come into close contact with an infected person. However, businesses are starting to implement rules that could work against those choosing to remain unvaccinated despite being eligible.

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For instance, while Ikea has been working with these rules since September, Wessex Water will implement the change in sick pay from January 10. Other companies, including Morrisons, have also chosen to impose restrictions on sick pay in the hopes of pushing people towards the vaccine.

"We appreciate that this is an emotive topic and all circumstances will be considered on a case-by-case basis," an Ikea spokesperson said.

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"Therefore, anyone in doubt or concerned about their situation is encouraged to speak to their manager."

Similarly, Wessex Water has said they will still pay full wages to staff if they test positive and isolate. A spokesperson stated that "the vast majority of [their] workforce has been vaccinated" while also noting that "vaccine appointments can be booked in work time".

They continued: "Absences due to Covid have doubled in the last week, so we need everyone to be available so we can continue to provide uninterrupted essential water and sewerage services."

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This comes as countries have been forced to find new ways to get their unvaccinated immunised, with some imposing vaccine mandates.

While UK care workers have been urged to get vaccinated since November, other sectors remain more relaxed concerning their vaccination policies.

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