London Pride: Over a million to gather in the capital for 50th anniversary parade 1 month ago

London Pride: Over a million to gather in the capital for 50th anniversary parade

The parade will pay homage to the UK's first Pride march back in 1972

More than a million people are expected to gather in the capital on Saturday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Pride in the UK.

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It is the first time the event has been able to go ahead since the pandemic, and organisers have said it will be the "biggest and most inclusive event in history".

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The parade will pay homage to the UK's first Pride march back in 1972, and pass a number of sites that were significant in the UK's LGBTQ+ movement. It will start at Hyde Park and finish at Whitehall Palace.

Gay Liberation Front will lead the parade, as they marched in the first protest in the seventies.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 02: A general view of Pride in London 2022: The 50th Anniversary - Parade on July 02, 2022 in London, England. (Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images) A general view of Pride in London 2022: The 50th Anniversary - Parade on July 2, 2022 in London, England. (Photo: Getty)
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Over 600 LGBT+ community groups will take part in the march. This will include members of UKRAINEPRIDE, who are currently unable to celebrate in their country as a result of the ongoing war.

Over 30,000 people have registered to march in the parade.

A number of familiar faces have already been spotted marching in the capital.

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The cast of LGBTQ+ show 'Heartstopper' have joined the parade, following the success of the Netflix series which came out earlier this year.

Emeli Sande, Eurovision-winner Netta, Samantha Mumba and Kat Graham are amongst those performing across four stages in Central London. Popstar Ava Max will close the show on the Trafalgar Square stage.

Labour leader Keir Starmer and deputy leader Angela Rayner also joined the march.

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Earlier this week, Pride organisers said uniformed officers should not march in the parade due to the Met's handling of the investigation into serial killer Stephen Port, as well as other incidents of homophobia, racism and sexist attitudes in the police force.

Speaking on the day of the event, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, who is also marching, said police have been "sensitive" to concerns about uniformed officers, and that those taking part in the parade itself would not be in uniform due to the "legitimate concerns" from activists.

Gay rights campaigner Peter Tatchell has called on the event to return to its radical political roots, The Guardian reports, saying that the 1972 march was about wider social change, not just equal rights for LGBTQ+ community.

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