Spain to welcome back unvaccinated Brits 'within days' just in time for the summer holidays 1 month ago

Spain to welcome back unvaccinated Brits 'within days' just in time for the summer holidays

The country's tourism industry is getting back on track

It seems as though unvaccinated Brits will soon be allowed back into Spain as the country looks set to reduce its foreign travel restrictions imminently. Just in time for the summer holiday, no less.

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Speaking on local radio station Onda Cero, Industry, Commerce and Tourism minster, Reyes Maroto informed listeners that covid restrictions and other post-pandemic rules for those arriving in the country will be relaxed "within days".

The revision will see holidaymakers from non-EU destinations who have not been fully vaccinated only need to provide a negative covid test in order to be eligible for travel.

Maroto went on to dub the updated policy as "very good news, long awaited by the tourism sector, which will effectively continue to position Spain as one of the preferred destinations for international tourists", adding that she expects not only tourism and income to exceed pre-pandemic numbers but the employment rate as well.

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Before coronavirus, it was estimated that more than 18.13 million Brits travel to Spain each year (according to stats from 2019) and while their doors have been open for foreign travel in some capacity since July 2020, those visiting have always required a full vaccine certification.

While exact details are yet to be confirmed, Spain's travel policies usually include the Canary Islands and Balearics - ie the likes of Tenerife, Majorca and Lanzarote etc - so those who refused to get jabbed and were still hoping to head to Ibiza for pool parties and long days on the beach look to be in the clear.

It goes without saying that before booking any trip abroad, you should always check the latest government advice on foreign travel as rules may still change and additional paperwork such as passenger locator forms may could still be required.

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