Baby seen lifted over Kabul airport fence reunited with dad 3 months ago

Baby seen lifted over Kabul airport fence reunited with dad

The Baby was actually receiving medical attention

The baby seen being lifted over a barbed wire fence at Kabul's airport has now been reunited with their father.

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The video, which has now gone viral, was posted by human rights activist Omar Haidiri. It depicts a young baby being lifted over a barbed-wire fence in the hopes of paratroopers taking them from Kabul. However, US paratroopers have now announced that the baby has been reunited with their father.

Baby Credit: US Central Command Public Affairs

The Marine Corps' Major Jim Stenger has confirmed that the baby is now 'safe' and has been reunited with their father.

In a statement to NBC News, Stenger said: "I can confirm the uniformed service member depicted in the video is a Marine with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit.

"The baby seen in the video was taken to a medical treatment facility on-site and cared for by medical professionals.

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"I can confirm the baby was reunited with their father and is safe at the airport.

"This is a true example of the professionalism of the Marines on site, who are making quick decisions in a dynamic situation in support of evacuation operations."

In a press briefing on Friday afternoon, Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said the baby wasn't being passed over to Marines to board a flight. Instead, the child was only handed over to the Marines to receive medical treatment in a 'humane act of compassion'.

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Stenger continued: "The parent asked the Marines to look after the baby because the baby was ill. The Marine you see reaching over the wall, took it to a Norwegian hospital at the airport. They treated the child and returned the child to the father.

"The baby was returned to its father. I don't know where they are now. Obviously, we have a responsibility to return a child to the parent. I don't know who the parent is, if they're an SIV applicant. It was a humane act of compassion by the Marines."