Woman who killed lottery winner backs bill to keep winners' names private 5 months ago

Woman who killed lottery winner backs bill to keep winners' names private

She is currently serving a life sentence

A woman who killed a lottery winner for their $30m prize money has now backed a bill looking to keep the names of future lottery winners a secret.

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Dorice Donegan 'Dee Dee' Moore, 49, is currently serving a life sentence for murdering 44-year-old Abraham Lee Shakespeare, in 2009.

However, from behind bars, Moore is a vocal supporter of a bill currently awaiting the signature of Florida Governor Ron DeSantis that would see the names of lottery winners sealed for 90 days - a period which she argues should be longer.

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Moore Credit: Hillsborough County Police Department - Dorice Donegan' Dee Dee' Moore, 49, is currently serving a life sentence for the murder of Abraham Lee Shakespeare, 42, back in 2009

A jury convicted Moore in December 2012 of first-degree murder. Despite numerous appeals, the courts upheld her conviction in both 2015 and 2019. They dubbed her continuous claim of innocence as "confusing, conclusory and vague."

Police described the Florida resident as a "pathological liar" and said she told Shakespeare she was writing a book on his $30m lottery win in 2006. Moore later convinced her victim to allow her access to his funds to aid him in managing the remaining $1m.

The courts heard that Moore later withdrew the $1m, spending it on a Hummer, a Corvette, a truck and a vacation.

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Shakespeare was shot dead in April 2009 but his body was discovered 10 months later beneath concrete slabs behind a home owned by Moore's ex-boyfriend in Hillsborough County, reports the Mail Online.

However, now Moore is looking to aid in getting the bill further into the legal system, with early reports suggesting it could become law as early as this month.

"I don't feel that's enough time," she said. "You've got to understand, this person has to change their whole life around."

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Moore believes that winners should be afforded at least six months of privacy, stating that: "90 days is nothing, you see how quick time flies."

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