Jeremy Corbyn put UKIP and the Tories in their place with one answer last night 5 years ago

Jeremy Corbyn put UKIP and the Tories in their place with one answer last night

"Paul, that is complete nonsense if I may so."

If you missed the BBC leaders' debate on Wednesday night, you weren't the only one.

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Theresa May decided not to attend, and sent Amber Rudd instead, two days after the Home Secretary's father passed away.

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Rudd came armed with gags, such as telling the audience and the watching millions to judge the Conservative Party on their record over the last seven years of government.

However, that's where the laughs ended. The debate often descended into a shouting match, and it is unlikely that anyone watching at home had their minds changed about how they plan to vote next week.

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There was one notable moment though and it arrived when Jeremy Corbyn's ideas about social justice were attacked by Paul Nuttall.

The UKIP leader took exception to Labour's promise to increase corporation tax. "We want to see corporation tax reduced, not raised," Nuttall said before going on to say that companies will leave the UK if Corbyn's policy is enacted.

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Corbyn replied by telling the UKIP leader he was talking nonsense, and that Labour aims to put the tax up to 26 percent over their term in government, which would be less than it was in 2010.

The Labour leader said that raising the corporation tax to that level would enable the government to tackle "the crisis in social care, the crisis in our NHS" and to "properly fund our schools."

Corbyn then turned to Rudd, and asked her had she ever visited a food bank, the dependence on which have spectacularly increased since the Tories came to power in 2010.

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You can watch the clip here:

However, in a BBC clip, the section where Corbyn spoke is cut down.

Gone is the moment when the Labour leader described how the increase in corporation tax will benefit society, in favour of Rudd comparing Labour's economic policies to a game of Monopoly.

You can watch that clip here: