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28th Oct 2023

Final resting place of Noah’s Ark may finally have been found

JOE

noah's ark

Evidence of one of the most iconic stories in the Bible may have been found

Scientists believe they may well have found the final resting place of Noah’s Ark, in what could be a significant discovery for biblical scholars.

A team of archaeologists claim they are close to confirming the final resting place of Noah’s Ark after excavating a geological formation in Turkey.

The excavation began in 2021, and as part of the analysis the team is conducting soil samples which they are hoping will contain evidence of the vessel, placing the site at 5,000 years old.

Initial findings show the sample contains clay soil, marine materials and seafood, which can often point to human activity.

The Biblical story claims that Noah’s Ark settled on the ‘mountains of Ararat’ in Turkey after the world-ending flood wiped life off the face of the Earth, with only those inside the vessel surviving.

Back to the excavation – scientists have been focusing on an area which has been the subject of expert speculation since 1956: a mountain located in Doğubayazıt district of Ağrı.

The mountain stands at 16,500 feet with an eerily coincidental curve that would match a giant boat perfectly.

A joint group from Istanbul Technical University, Andrews University, and Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University are conducting the search on the site to put these theories to bed one way or another.

A spokesperson for the study said: “According to the first findings obtained from the studies, there have been human activities in the region since the Chalcolithic period between the years 5500 and 3000 BC.

“It is known that the flood of Prophet Noah went back 5,000 years ago.

“’In terms of dating, it is stated that there was life in this region as well. This was revealed in the laboratory results.”

He did, however, concede that more testing was needed in order to determine whether the Ark was in fact in this location at all, and of course the findings remain contested.

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